Last edited by Meshakar
Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

4 edition of Pneumonia in the Hospital Setting, An Issue of Clinics in Chest Medicine found in the catalog.

Pneumonia in the Hospital Setting, An Issue of Clinics in Chest Medicine

Marin Kollef

Pneumonia in the Hospital Setting, An Issue of Clinics in Chest Medicine

by Marin Kollef

  • 165 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Saunders .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Respiratory medicine,
  • Medical,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • Medical / Pulmonary & Thoracic Medicine,
  • Pulmonary & Thoracic Medicine,
  • Community-Acquired Infections,
  • Cross Infection,
  • Pneumonia

  • Edition Notes

    The Clinics: Surgery

    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages240
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11756854M
    ISBN 101416028102
    ISBN 109781416028109

    Health Care Associated Pneumonia American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines (): New category of infections to encompass recent inpatient or on ongoing treatment in a long-term or outpatient health care facility HCAP New pneumonia in: • Any patient who was hospitalized in an acute care hospital for 2 or more days within 90 days of the. Each year, about a million people in the United States end up in the hospital with pneumonia, a serious lung infection that can be caused by an array of different viruses, bacteria, and even fungi. New research suggests that older people hospitalized with pneumonia face four times their usual risk of a having a heart attack or stroke or dying.

      Viral pneumonias are more likely to be treated at home, and not at the hospital. Viral pneumonia caused by the flu can be treated with an antiviral medication called . Introduction Healthcare providers in resource-limited settings rely on the presence of tachypnoea and chest indrawing to establish a diagnosis of pneumonia in children. We aimed to determine the test characteristics of commonly assessed signs and symptoms for the radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia in children 0–59 months of age. Methods We conducted an analysis using patient-level pooled.

    chest pain, and a productive cough with thick phlegm. Pneumonia that develops outside the hospital setting is commonly referred to as community-acquired pneumonia. Pneumonia that develops 48 hours or later after admission to the hospital is known as nosocomial or hospital-acquired pneumonia. In this issue of the Journal, Claessens and colleagues (pp. –) present their study of patients with a clinical diagnosis of CAP who had both a chest X-ray and a thoracic computed tomography (CT) scan at the time of admission. Disturbingly, 30% of patients who were felt to have CAP based on the presentation and chest X-ray had no.


Share this book
You might also like
Behavioral intervention in human problems.

Behavioral intervention in human problems.

Celebrations and attacks

Celebrations and attacks

motion picture study programm ....

motion picture study programm ....

History of Lumberport and surrounding communities.

History of Lumberport and surrounding communities.

Navajo National Monument, Arizona

Navajo National Monument, Arizona

Israel Horovitz, Vol. II: New England Blue

Israel Horovitz, Vol. II: New England Blue

The language of the birds

The language of the birds

This will be my undoing

This will be my undoing

Geology and groundwater resources of western Crawford County, Pennsylvania

Geology and groundwater resources of western Crawford County, Pennsylvania

Waste minimization assessment for a manufacturer of product carriers and printed labels

Waste minimization assessment for a manufacturer of product carriers and printed labels

Impressionist and modern paintings, drawings and sculpture

Impressionist and modern paintings, drawings and sculpture

Exploring Careers in Video

Exploring Careers in Video

Restriction of immigration.

Restriction of immigration.

History of ancient India

History of ancient India

Lives of the great composers

Lives of the great composers

Pneumonia in the Hospital Setting, An Issue of Clinics in Chest Medicine by Marin Kollef Download PDF EPUB FB2

Read the latest articles of Clinics in Chest Medicine atElsevier’s leading platform of peer-reviewed scholarly literature Receive an update when the latest issues in this journal are published.

Sign in to set up alerts. select article Contents. select article Prevention of Pneumonia in the Hospital Setting. https. This issue of Clinics in Chest Medicine edited by Dr. Michael Niederman focuses on Pneumonia with topics including: Inflammation and Pneumonia; The Lung Microbiome's Role in Pneumonia; Biomarkers for the Management of Pneumonia; Influenza and Viral Pneumonia; Guidelines to Manage Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP); Vaccines to Prevent CAP; Adjunctive Therapies for CAP; Healthcare.

Clinics Pneumonia in the Hospital Setting Chest Medicine. CiteScore. Impact Factor. Articles & Issues. About. Publish. Latest issue All issues. Search in this journal. Pneumonia. Edited by Michael S. Niederman. Vol Issue 4, Pages (December ) Download full issue.

Previous vol/issue select article Aerosol Therapy for Pneumonia in the Intensive. Purchase Pneumonia, An Issue of Clinics in Chest Medicine, Volume - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: "March " Description: xiv pages, pages [1] illustrations ; 26 cm.

Contents: The systemic response to lung infection / Jane C. Deng and Theodore J. Standiford --Pulmonary host defenses and factors predisposing to lung infection / Carol M. Mason and Steve Nelson --Community-acquired pneumonia and sepsis / Michelle A.

Beutz. This issue of Clinics in Chest Medicine focuses on Viral and Atypical Pneumonia. Editors Charles Dela Cruz and Richard Wunderlink have assembled an expert team of authors on topics such as: Epidemiology of Viral Pneumonia; Diagnostic Testing for Viral and.

The American College of Chest Physicians is the global leader in advancing best patient outcomes through innovative chest medicine education, clinical research, and team-based care. With more t members representing + countries around the world, our mission is to champion the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of chest diseases.

Double pneumonia is a condition in which pneumonia affects both lungs. It can develop from flu or another infection that affects the lungs. Symptoms include a. Clinics in Chest Medicine is published by Elsevier. Current Issue. September ; March Pneumonia in the Hospital Setting Guest Editor: M.

Kollef. - Volume December Interstitial Lung Disease: Earn CME credit while reading your Clinics issues. Subscribers to Clinics CME can earn up to 60 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s. A normal chest x-ray, given the right clinical picture, should not deter one from going down the pneumonia pathway. A study by Basi et al concluded that a third of patients admitted for pneumonia had no proof radiographically, but had “serious” lower respiratory infections with similar rates of positive sputum and blood cultures and similar.

Pneumonia can be caused by a wide variety of bacteria, viruses or fungi. Pneumonia is most commonly classified by the type of germ that causes it and by the location where the person became infected. Community-acquired pneumonia is the most common type of pneumonia.

This type of pneumonia occurs outside of a hospital or other healthcare facility. Pneumonia often occurs following an upper respiratory respiratory tract infections can result from colds or the flu. They’re caused by germs, such as viruses, fungi, and bacteria.

Kollef et al. Epidemiology and outcomes of health-care-associated pneumonia: results from a large US database of culture-positive pneumonia. Chest () vol.

(6) pp. Hiramatsu and. Clinics in Chest Medicine updates those in the fields of anesthesia, critical care, and respiratory medicine on the latest trends in patient management, providing a sound basis for choosing the best treatment options.

Published quarterly—in March, June, September, and December—each issue offers state-of-the-art reviews on a single topic, including diseases of air movement and airways. Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) or nosocomial pneumonia refers to any pneumonia contracted by a patient in a hospital at least 48–72 hours after being admitted.

It is thus distinguished from community-acquired is usually caused by a bacterial infection, rather than a virus. HAP is the second most common nosocomial infection (after urinary tract infections) and accounts for   Results: Logistic regression analysis identified rales, a temperature ≥ °F (°C), chest pain, dyspnoea, rhonchi, heart rate, respiratory rate, and rhinorrhoea, as the best explanation for the variation in diagnosis of pneumonia compared to either of the alternative diagnoses (R 2 = ), with rales and a temperature ≥ °F explaining 30% of the variation.

Guidelines for empiric treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have been developed to assist in prescribing appropriate antimicrobials.

We studied utilization of guidelines developed by the American Thoracic, Canadian Infectious Diseases, and Canadian Thoracic Societies (ATS, CIDS, and CTS, respectively), physicians' familiarity with them, reasons that prompt deviation from them, and.

This guideline addresses the clinical entity of pneumonia that is acquired outside of the hospital setting. Although we recognize that CAP is frequently diagnosed without the use of a chest radiograph, especially in the ambulatory setting, we have focused on studies that used radiographic criteria for defining CAP, given the known inaccuracy of.

Chest physiotherapy is widely used as an adjunct treatment for pneumonia, and aims to help clear tracheobronchial secretions, reduce airway resistance, and enhance gas exchange. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE EVIDENCE. The three RCTs were conducted in hospital settings. INTRODUCTION. Nosocomial pneumonia (NP) is defined as an infection of the lung parenchyma that was neither present nor incubating at the time of hospital admission and which develops after 48 hours of hospital admission.[] Data from the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance system (NNIS) of the United States suggests nosocomial pneumonia as the second most common nosocomial infection in.

A second study included adults admitted to the emergency department for community-acquired pneumonia.3 Patients were randomized to receive usual care or therapy guided by procalcitonin levels.

"Gurgling Breath Sounds May Predict Hospital Acquired Pneumonia" by Dr. Rodrigo Vasquez et al. published in Chest (article behind paywall) is one of only 6 articles in all of PubMed that have 'gurgling' in the title.Pneumonia complicates hospitalization in to % of patients and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality.

Risk factors for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) include mechanical ventilation for > 48 h, residence in an ICU, duration of ICU or hospital stay, severity of underlying illness, and presence of comorbidities.